Oh happy day

Greetings, salutations and best wishes for the most festive of National Grammar Day celebrations.

How will you honor the occasion, after digesting your daily dose of Word Nymph, of course?

My personal observance of the day involved entering a copy editing contest sponsored by one of my favorite resources, Copyediting, whose tagline is “because language matters.” Amen.

The contest closed at 9:00 a.m. yesterday. Now I wait for winners to be announced. Make that “Now I wait for Copyediting to announce the winners.” Active voice.

This past year we have celebrated National Punctuation Day and National Dictionary Day together, so it’s only fitting that we be together online today. Be, present subjunctive.

We come to this place throughout the year to ask questions, admit our faults and, yes, occasionally, to preach. We laugh at the idiocies of language, at each other and at ourselves.

This reminds me of the motto of my church, which begins with “We welcome the faithful, the seeker and the doubter.” At the risk of being irreverent, and/ or breaking the eighth commandment, I think it applies in this place as well.

Word Nymph invites you to honor this day by celebrating the notion that language does indeed matter. None of us is born knowing language. Is, singular. We learn to communicate as children and we continue to learn as adults. We believe, we seek, we doubt. And I like to think we have good fun in the process.

Happy National Grammar Day. May the occasion bring us all continued thirst for delightful language.

Oh, and if I win that copy editing contest, I’m taking my Quick Check Editorial Reference Cards and heading out for a wild time.

6 Comments

Filed under All Things Wordish, Holidays, Technology and Social Media

6 responses to “Oh happy day

  1. Sheree Moyer

    Good luck! You are my odds on favorite!

  2. Mom

    O happy day, indeed! I share your subjunctive mood!

  3. Quick Check Editorial Cards? Where can I get a set of those?!

  4. Jo

    Except our church is determined to keep the Oxford comma in its welcoming statement. Gnash.

  5. Word Nymph

    …and a misplaced ampersand. But who are we to judge? 🙂

  6. Polly

    Your blog is the best way to celebrate. Witty, intelligent and practical. Love it!

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